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Usability Testing

Usability Testing Why is Usability Important?

Usability looks at how easy it is for a user of your site to navigate your website and accomplish the goals that you have set for that site – find a health care provider, apply for admissions to your college, etc. Reviewing your site for usability issues and finding ways to address them is critical for a well-functional and effective web presence. Without it, your site runs the potential of being too difficult to use and people will leave the site.

Services


Optimization Review of Website

The optimization review is a basic review of the site by the Web Content Optimizer for issues of accessibility, usability, and search engine optimization. This report is done as a last step prior to a site launch, but should be undertaken periodically by units. The review makes recommendations to improve information architecture, navigation, use of links and key pathway processes.


Card-Sorting: Online

Card sorting is a usability technique that asks the intended audiences of a site to categorize the content of the site based off of their own personal preferences. Card sorting can be categorized or uncategorized.


Card-Sorting: In Person

Card sorting is a usability technique that asks the intended audiences of a site to categorize the content of the site based off of their own personal preferences. Card sorting can be categorized or uncategorized.


Heat Map Tracking

Heat Map Tracking is an analytic measuring tool for reviewing where individuals click on a page and where they abandon a page while scrolling.


Paper Prototyping

Paper prototyping is a low cost method of testing user interfaces without spending significant time of coding and development. Proposed interfaces are presented to a participant and as the participant goes about accomplishing a task, the tester manipulates the paper prototype to show the user how the interface reacts to their actions.


Questionnaires/Surveys

Questionnaires and Surveys would be used to capture user sentiment and reactions to the site. Unlike our other Usability Tests, the questionnaire/survey would be a user-initiated review of the site that would be accessed during real time use of the web site or application.


A/B Comparison Testing

A/B testing allows the testing of two different approaches to a design or usability problem on a website. In this experimental model, two different versions of a web page are created, each with a different approach to content layout, design of graphics and buttons, etc. The first visitor to a given page is served Version A; the next visitor, Version B. In an iterative change environment, Version A is usually the original version of a web page on the site, and serves as a control to measure the effective of the proposed changes in Version B.


Informal Usability Testing

Informal Usability Testing is used to measure user behavior and interaction with our website, in the presence of a Web Services moderator. The moderator records how the user tries to accomplish certain tasks on the website. Using the subjects’ feedback, Web Services them recommends iterative site changes to improve the site’s function.

Formal Usability Testing: Formal Usability Testing would follow the same general outline as above, but would include a much larger sample size (20-100). Given the logistics in pulling together this sample size, Web Services would recommend the informal model whenever possible, using A/B Testing to validate intended changes if required.


Focus Groups

Focus Groups are used as a group-think exercise to determine public perception to site design and structure.  Focus Groups would be used to gather the view of potential users to our web sites. Unlike other usability tests we offer, focus groups would give us subjective data.


Usability Testing Plan

Are you interested in making usability testing a service line for your web office? We’re providing our Usability Testing planning document as a resource in doing just that!

For each of the services we are offering, the document outlines: what we test; why we test; the targets, goals, and outcomes of the test; the ROI in doing and the risks in not doing the test; and methodology, timetable, and resources needed for each test.